Founded in April 15, 2008

    EQUINE REHABILITATION AND THERMOGRAPHY SCHOOL

    EQUINE MASSAGE

    Horse massage treatment – Equine Thermography – Equine massage courses

    About us

    About us

    EQUINE MASSAGE - EQUINE REHABILITATION AND THERMOGRAPHY SCHOOL

    tthe company “Equine Massage Maria Soroko – Equine Rehabilitation and Thermography School” was founded in 2008. The company is engaged in promotion of equine massage and the application of thermography in horses.
    Throughout its seven – year history, the company has been associated with organizing and developing courses on equine massage in equestrian centers. Two-day courses introduce the basis of sports massage, covering theoretical and practical aspects of the horse skeletal and muscular system, physiological functioning of the muscles, saddle fitting issues and a sports massage session. To date around 80 sports massage courses and workshops have been organized in a variety of equestrian centers and universities within Poland.
    The company also promotes the application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation. Thermography is in practical use for detecting the impact of training and physiotherapy treatments (including massage) on the horse’s body. Thermography is also used in equine veterinary medicine. The company cooperates with veterinarians in horse diagnosis.
    On the topic of equine thermography,10 refereed papers and 20 other papers have been published.

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    In January 2014 the company established cooperation with the Animal Physiotherapist Institution in developing and conducting professional equine physiotherapy courses. The courses are organized under the supervision of the Polish Association of Animal Physiotherapists, Warsaw, Poland.
    The Professional Equine Physiotherapy course is designed for students wishing to build a career in the field of equine rehabilitation, but is also regularly attended by veterinarians, physical therapists, chiropractors, human massage therapists and equine massage body workers who would like to enhance their skills or continue their education within their profession.
    After completing the course and required exams, students will be able to confidently apply a complete professional sports massage and will obtain a certificate of completion of the course – a profession in accordance with the Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 11.01.2012 in Poland.
    In Poland, the profession of animal body worker hasn’t been established and horse treatment can be performed by anyone, whereas in other European countries, America or Australia the profession is officially registered.
    The Animal Physiotherapist Institution together with the Polish Association of Animal Physiotherapists is applying to register a new profession – animal body worker – on the list of the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy.
    More information about courses for professional equine physiotherapists and equine body workers can be found on the Animal Physiotherapist Institution website www.zoofizjoterapia.edu.pl.
    The company cooperates with the Association of Sustainable Development, Wroclaw, Poland in promoting equine rehabilitation and thermography and in organizing courses, conferences and seminars on scientific research associated with equine physiology.
    Since 2008 the company, in co-operation with the Association of Sustainable Development, has organized and developed two-day workshops on Equine Massage within equestrian centers within Poland. The company has also co-operated with Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, the University of Technology and Life Sciences in Bydgoszcz, and the University of Life Sciences and University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn in conducting lectures and courses on equine rehabilitation and thermography for postgraduate and undergraduate veterinary and animal science students.
    Currently the company Equine Massage – Maria Soroko promotes equine rehabilitation and thermography by:
    •  organizing workshops, courses, seminars and conferences;
    •  conducting research and publication of  scientific and overview papers
    •  publishing books
    •  cooperating with equine rehabilitation centers, racing centers, equine clinics, riding centers and breeding centers, and sport riding centers.
    Equine Massage invites equestrian centers and universities to cooperate in developing equine rehabilitation and thermography in science and practice by conducting common marketing activities, research studies, workshops, courses, seminars and conferences.
    In September 2013 Equine Massage together with the Association of Sustainable Development signed a partnership agreement with Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Biology and Animal Science, for:
    •    conducting courses on equine massage and the application of thermography in horses;
    •    conducting equine rehabilitation modules;
    •    conducting research and publication;
    •    organizing seminars and conferences;
    •    for animal husbandry students and veterinary students.

    plakat_02_07In 2014 the company Equine Massage founded the Association of Animal Thermography, Wroclaw, Poland to promote animal applications of infrared thermography and its use both in clinical and experimental medicine. The Association brings together researchers from research institutions, universities and also practitioners who conduct studies on the application of thermography in large animals (horses, cattle) or in small animals (dogs, cats, fur animals).

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    The main goals of the Association of Animal Thermography are:
    •    improving and expanding the knowledge of animal thermography;
    •    organizing seminars, conferences, courses and lectures promoting animal thermography;
    •    conducting research, educational courses, and teaching both for members and people not associated with the association
    •    to assist in improving scientific research in the area of thermology
    •    to encourage the exchange of ideas and experiences between thermological associations.
    •    to create and expand contacts with other  associations and research institution.

    2014 SUMMARY

    Year 2014 for Equine Massage – Maria Soroko was very successful

    Company business activity has developed in 4 directions: equine massage practice, equine thermography application, publications, education.

    Equine massage practice: The company has increased the number of clients, and also established cooperation with a number of equestrian centers for conducting regular massage treatments for sport horses.
    As part of an equine physiotherapy promotion, Equine Massage conducted seminars at three different equestrian meetings: „Considering the Horse” in Ściegnach, “Equine Manual Therapy” seminar for students from postgraduate studies of Animal Breeding and Biology Faculty, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, and for students from the course organized by the Polish Equestrian Association.

    Equine thermography application: A big success for the company was publication of the book under the title:  „Equine Thermography in practice”, author: Maria Soroko – owner of the company. The book is a compendium of the practical application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation. Numerous cases are presented, combining thermographic examination with the practical application of manual assessment of the horse used in equine physiotherapy.
    Another big success for the company was the founding of the Association of Animal Thermography, Wroclaw, Poland, which promotes animal applications of infrared thermography and its use both in clinical and experimental medicine. The Association brings together researchers from research institutions, universities and also practitioners who conduct studies on the application of thermography in large animals (horses, cattle) or in small animals (dogs, cats, fur animals).

    Publications: In September one of the best veterinary journals –  Journal of Equine Veterinary Science www.j-evs.com published the research paper: Soroko M., Dudek K., Howell K., Jodkowska E., Henklewski R.: 2014. Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 34(9):1076-1083. The paper was also presented at the 1st Seminar of Medical Infrared Thermography at the Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    In addition, articles about equine physiotherapy were published in equestrian magazines. The research paper Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K. Thermography diagnosis in monitoring annual racehorses’ training cycle has been accepted for publication in Veterinary Medicine. Also one overview paper Soroko M., Howell K. Thermography in equine medicine has been accepted for publication in Equine Veterinary Education.
    In the coming year there is a plan to publish further research papers about the application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation.

    EDUCATION: Equine Massage organized regular equine massage courses (I and II level) at a variety of equestrian centers. For many years, these courses have been very popular within Poland.
    This year was a turning point for conducting professional courses. In January the company started cooperation with the Animal Physiotherapist Institution for developing and conducting together professional equine physiotherapy courses. The first edition of the equine physiotherapy course took place at the end of the year. Participants, after passing the internal final exams, received professional recogniction in accordance with the Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 11.01.2012 in Poland.

    As part of this cooperation an equine massage course was also organized. The Animal Physiotherapist Institution, together with the Polish Association of Animal Physiotherapists is applying to register a new profession – animal body worker – on the list of the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy.

    Equine Massage, together with the Association of Sustainable Development, signed a formal cooperation with The Faculty of Biology and Animal Science, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, for conducting scientific and research plans, educational programs, and realization of conferences, seminars, symposiums, lectures, courses and workshops.
    The University of Technology, Life Sciences in Bydgoszcz, and University of Life Sciences and University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn also cooperated with Equine Massage in conducting equine rehabilitation and thermography courses.

    In December the company was present at Equestrian Fair – Cavaliadza in Poznan, Poland, giving a seminar on proper saddle fit and on the application of thermography in equine rehabilitation. The stand with information about the company service and the promotion of the book .: “Equine Thermography in Practice” attracted a lot of people.

    The coming year 2015 promises to be very successful in equine massage practice development, conducting courses, seminars and conferences and in the practical and scientific application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation.
    We would like to thank everyone who is cooperating with Equine Massage for such a successful year and wish you all the best in the New Year!

    We wish everyone who is working as an equine physiotherapist and works with thermography a lot of successes in 2015. We hope to cooperate together in the near future.

    Dr. Maria Soroko

    TEAM

    TEAM

    Dr. Maria Soroko – owner and director of the company “Equine Massage – Maria Soroko”, which offers equine rehabilitation and thermography services, professional courses and workshops associated with horse rehabilitation and the application of thermography in veterinary and sports medicine.

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    Dr. Maria Soroko – owner and director of the company “Equine Massage – Maria Soroko”, which offers equine rehabilitation and thermography services, professional courses and workshops associated with horse rehabilitation and the application of thermography in veterinary and sports medicine.
    Maria gained her PhD in Agricultural Science with a specialisation in Animal Husbandry from the University of Environmental and Life Sciences of Wroclaw, Department of Horse Breeding and Equestrian Studies in 2013. The phd dissertation considered the effect of long-term training on racehorse body surface temperature, Her Masters degree in Equine Science was completed in 2010 at the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales, United Kingdom.
    Since 2008 the author has practiced thermography extensively in equine physiotherapy and in veterinary medicine, cooperating with veterinarians, horse breeders and trainers.
    Maria is also Founder and chairperson of the Association of Animal Thermography, Wroclaw, Poland, which promotes the animal application of infrared thermography and its use both in clinical and experimental medicine.
    Maria has many years of experience in equine physiotherapy, achieving qualifications as an Equine Body Worker in sport massage and remedial therapy. Maria is also a riding instructor at the British Horse Society. Her skills and experience were achieved both in Europe and Australia.
    She conducts research on the application of thermography in sport and racing horses, authoring over 30 original publications and overview papers, also authoring a book monograph: Soroko M. Equine thermography in practice, published by Association of Sustainable Development, Wroclaw, Poland, 2014

    In 2014 the company established a research team, founded by: owner and director of the Equine Massage company Dr Maria Soroko, Dr Kevin Howell – Clinical Scientist in Microvascular Diagnostics and an Honorary Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK and Dr Krzysztof Dudek – researcher from the Institute of Machines Design and Operation, Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland.
    The group has extensive experience of infrared thermography in the detection of:
    •    equine musculoskeletal injury,
    •    subclinical inflammation of racehorses,
    •    influence of training on the musculoskeletal system
    •    rehabilitation effects
    The group has also expertise in the development of new thermographic techniques and quality assurance of thermal imaging for biomedical applications.
    Our team can offer research expertise in:
    •    application of thermography in veterinary medicine, training and rehabilitation;
    •    procurement of thermographic equipment and advice on quality assurance;
    •    study design and statistical analysis of data.
    Our achievements:
    Cooperation with Microvascular Diagnostics, UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, London, UK
    2014 July: Presentation of research paper “Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance” at the 1st Seminar of Medical Infrared Thermography at the Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Publications:
    Soroko M., Dudek K., Howell K., Jodkowska E., Henklewski R.: 2014. Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 34(9):1076-1083, (0,8 IF).
    Soroko M., Howell K.: 2015. Thermography in equine medicine. Equine Veterinary Education accepted for publication (0.773)
    Goals for 2015:
    Presentation of research papers at the 7th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science Belfast UK, 29 Aug – 2 Sept 2016 and at the Quantitative InfraRed Thermography Conference, 2-6.07.16, Gdańsk University of Technology in Poland
    Publishing further research papers on the application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation.
    Publishing the book under the title “Equine Thermography in Practice” in UK.

    Books and monographs
    Soroko M.: 2014. Equine thermography in practice. Wroclaw, Association of Sustainable Development. In Polish, 105 pp., ISBN 978 83 939460 0 6.

    Publications

    Refereed papers

    Jodkowska E., Dudek K., Soroko M: 2015. Temperature range analysis (Tmax) on dorsal surface of sporting horses. Turkish Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, 39: 229-232 (IF 0,31 IF).
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2015. Thermography diagnosis in monitoring annual racehorses’ training cycle. Veterinary Medicine, 71 (01), 52-58 (0,203 IF).
    Soroko M., Dudek K., Howell K., Jodkowska E., Henklewski R.: 2014. Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 34(9):1076-1083, (0,765 IF).
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2014. Thermography diagnosis in monitoring annual racehorses’ training cycle. Veterinary Medicine, accepted for publication (0,203 IF).
    Soroko M., Henklewski R., Filipowski H., Jodkowska E.: 2013. The effectiveness of thermo-graphic analysis in equine orthopedics. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 33(4) (0,765 IF).
    Soroko M., Henklewski R., Jodkowska E.: 2012. Comparison of thermographic, radiographic and ultrasonographic results in diagnosing racehorses orthopedic diseases. Veterinary Medicine, 68(11):693-696 (0,203 IF)
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Zabłocka M.: 2012. The use of thermography to evaluate back musculoskeletal response on young racehorses in training. Thermology International, 22(3):152-156.
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2012. The effects of age on dorsal surface temperature distribution of half-breed mares. Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences Publisher LXVII, 591, 35-40.
    Konieczny G., Soroko M., Ptak A., Kuciel N.: 2012. Changes of the superficial body temperature in response to post-application (taping) skin irritation. Biomedical Engineering, 18(3):1-4.
    Soroko M.: 2011. Thermographic diagnosis of sport horses’ limbs. Biomedical Engineering, 17(2):104-109.
    Soroko M.: 2011. Analysis of superficial temperature distribution of lower part of the limbs in young racehorses. Measurement Automation and Monitoring, 57(10):1157-1160.
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2012. The effects of age on dorsal surface temperature distribution of half-breed mares. Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences Publisher LXVII, 591, 35-40.
    Soroko M.: 2010. Thermography in sport – monitoring effects of athletes injuries. Biomedical Engineering, 16(1):46-47.

    Other papers
    Soroko M., Henklewski R.: 2013. The effectiveness of thermographic analysis in diagnosis orthopedic diseases in racehorses. Veterinary Magazine, 196(22):879-883.
    Soroko M.: 2013. Benefits of equine massage therapy. Zycie Weterynaryjne, 88(1):44-46.
    Jodkowska E., Soroko M.: 2012. The effectiveness of thermography in equine veterinary medicine. Zycie Weterynaryjne, 87(2):749-752.
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E.: 2011. Usefulness of thermography applied in equine veterinary medicine and in the equine industry. Veterinary Medicine, 67:397 – 401 (0,203 IF).
    Soroko M.: 2011. Compendium of thermography applied in the equine diagnosis, rehabilitation and management. Animal Production Review, 7:23-25.
    Soroko M.: 2011. Why is the passive stay apparatus limited to the horse? Animal Production Review, 4:29-30.
    Soroko M.: 2009. Equine thermography diagnosis. Lower Silesian Chamber of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin, 19,2(74):109-111.

     

    ABOUT RESEARCH TEAM

    In 2014 the company established a research team, founded by: owner and director of the Equine Massage company Dr Maria Soroko, Dr Kevin Howell – Clinical Scientist in Microvascular Diagnostics and an Honorary Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK and Dr Krzysztof Dudek – researcher from the Institute of Machines Design and Operation, Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland.
    The group has extensive experience of infrared thermography in the detection of:
    •    equine musculoskeletal injury,
    •    subclinical inflammation of racehorses,
    •    influence of training on the musculoskeletal system
    •    rehabilitation effects
    The group has also expertise in the development of new thermographic techniques and quality assurance of thermal imaging for biomedical applications.
    Our team can offer research expertise in:
    •    application of thermography in veterinary medicine, training and rehabilitation;
    •    procurement of thermographic equipment and advice on quality assurance;
    •    study design and statistical analysis of data.
    Our achievements:
    Cooperation with Microvascular Diagnostics, UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, London, UK
    2014 July: Presentation of research paper “Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance” at the 1st Seminar of Medical Infrared Thermography at the Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Publications:
    Soroko M., Dudek K., Howell K., Jodkowska E., Henklewski R.: 2014. Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 34(9):1076-1083, (0,8 IF).
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2012. The effects of age on dorsal surface temperature distribution of half-breed mares. Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences Publisher LXVII, 591, 35-40.
    Soroko M., Jodkowska E., Dudek K.: 2015. Thermography diagnosis in monitoring annual racehorses’ training cycle. Veterinary Medicine, accepted for publication (0,203 IF).
    Soroko M., Howell K.: 2015. Thermography in equine medicine. Equine Veterinary Education accepted for publication (0.773)
    Goals for 2015:
    Presentation of research papers at the XIII European Association of Thermology Congress in Madrid, www.eat2015.info
    Publishing further research papers on the application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation.
    Publishing the book under the title “Equine Thermography in Practice”.

    Research Group

    Paulina Zielińska_ok

    Paulina Zielińska DVD
    works at the Department of Equine Surgery at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Environmental and Life Science in Wroclaw (Poland). In her work she is focused on equine physiotherapy and rehabilitation. She specializes in treatment of equine orthopedic disease with High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT).  She also works in her private practice of equine medicine and rehabilitation in Opole (Poland).

    Kevin Howell_ok

    Dr Kevin Howell
    is a Clinical Scientist in Microvascular Diagnostics and an Honorary Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Royal Free Hospital, London. He has over 20 years of experience in medical infrared thermography and has published more than 30 papers on infrared imaging topics including human and equine research applications. He also has a particular interest in quality assurance of thermography in biology and medicine. Kevin is a member of the European Association of Thermology.

    Dr Krzysztof Dudek
    – researcher from the Institute of Machines Design and Operation, Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland. Specialist in statistical analysis.


    Zespol_PĘZIŃSKA-KIJAK

    tech. wet. mgr Katarzyna Pęzińska-Kijak

    Zespol_Małgorzata Kizerwetter

    Małgorzata Kizerwetter MSc
    Graduate from the Academy of Physical Education in Warsaw, M.Sc. in physiotherapy. During her studies she completed a course of animal physiotherapy. She has  been working as a clinician since 2009. Employed in the Animal Rehabilitation Centre in Warsaw since 2011. Małgorzata has been a lecturer in animal rehabilitation courses since 2009. Founder and director of Studium Fizjoterapii Zwierząt – a school of animal physiotherapy. One of the founders and director of the Polish Association of Physiotherapists.

    Zespol_Iwona Dębska

    Iwona Dębska

    animal physiotherapy

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    BOOK – EQUINE THERMOGRAPHY IN PRACTICE

    Okladka angielska

    Tiltle: “Equine Thermography in Practice”
    Author: Dr Maria Soroko
    Publisher: Association of Sustainable Development.
    Year of publication: 2014
    “Equine Thermography in Practice” is a compendium of the practical application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation. Currently, thermography is one of the most modern and recognised diagnostic methods in the world. As it is a non-invasive method, its use is safe and consequently the popularity of equine thermography is increasing.

    The intensive training of horses is associated with physical demands on the musculoskeletal system, contributing to frequent injuries. This leads to changes in blood circulation and thereby in body surface temperature. The application of thermography can detect these changes in surface temperature and monitor injuries, diseases and overloads of the musculoskeletal system. This book is the only available publication describing the practical application of thermography in horses. Numerous cases are presented, combining thermographic examination with the practical application of manual assessment of the horse used in equine physiotherapy.

    READ MORE ABUT THE BOOK

    Summary of the book
    Introduction
    “Equine Thermography in Practice” is a compendium of the practical application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine and rehabilitation. Currently, thermography is one of the most modern and recognised diagnostic methods in the world. As it is a non-invasive method, its use is safe and consequently the popularity of equine thermography is increasing.
    The intensive training of horses is associated with physical demands on the musculoskeletal system, contributing to frequent injuries. This leads to changes in blood circulation and thereby in body surface temperature. The application of thermography can detect these changes in surface temperature and monitor injuries, diseases and overloads of the musculoskeletal system.
    This book is the only available publication describing the practical application of thermography in horses. Numerous cases are presented, combining thermographic examination with the practical application of manual assessment of the horse used in equine physiotherapy.

    Briefly about chapters
    The book consists of six chapters, which include a wide array of thermography applications in equine medicine, rehabilitation and equestrian sport. Almost every chapter has been expanded to include several subchapters. The book is presented in a clear and understandable way to the average reader who has a general knowledge of equine anatomy, and that of other domestic animals. All descriptions are complemented by numerous instructional thermal images, photographs and illustrations. This rich illustrative material perfectly introduces the reader to advanced concepts.

    The first chapter discusses the principles of thermography, including characteristics of the heat transfer processes that occur in the body of the horse. The next subchapters introduce the principles of thermographic camera use, and the application of thermography for detecting the body surface temperature distribution of the horse. This introduction is extremely important in order to understand the further chapters related directly to the practical application of thermography.

    The second and third chapters introduce some of the applications of equine thermography. The second chapter presents a literature review on the use of thermography in veterinary medicine, confirming that relatively little research has been conducted in this scientific area both in Poland and worldwide, with the earliest publications dating from as recently as the 1970s. This is why thermography is still novel and only a few scientists currently carry out research based on the method. In the next chapter entitled “Thermography applications in equestrian sports,” thermography is introduced as a screening technique recommended by the International Federation for Equestrian Sports for the detection of illegal limb sensitivity in competition horses. If the examining veterinarians observe excessively sensitive or insensitive limbs, together with abnormal thermal patterns detected by thermography, a horse can be disqualified from competition on the basis of horse welfare and fair play.

    The fourth chapter describes the thermographic examination. It addresses the correct order for the examination, taking into account the impact of environmental conditions. In order to enhance the diagnostic value of thermography the examination room and horse should be thoroughly prepared beforehand. The subchapter explains the proper way of taking thermographic images of the individual parts of the body, including many practical instructions. In addition to knowledge of the proper imaging techniques, it is also vital to have the ability to interpret thermographic images correctly. This section of the book contains examples of different thermographic images, referring to all parts of the body which should be considered to diagnose the horse.
    The last chapter of the book concerns the use of thermography in equine physiotherapy, which in recent years has become much more popular in equestrian sport. The chapter introduces the possibilities for thermography in diagnosing the most common injuries caused by improper training, together with the effects of rehabilitation. This chapter is illustrated by thermographic images demonstrating 10 different cases of injured horses, and should be of particularly interest for equine physiotherapists since it includes lots of practical advice.

    Summary
”Equine Thermography in Practice” is a valuable contribution to the equestrian literature, and one which has been eagerly awaited, particularly by equine physiotherapists. It is the first publication on the equestrian book market which extensively discusses thermography-related issues and its use in the diagnosis of horses. At the same time, this book is up to the standard of an academic textbook. That is why it is useful for students of veterinary medicine and animal husbandry, as well as for students of other courses where equine studies are presented. Undoubtedly, the book’s advantage is that it not only includes the latest findings from this field, but it is also largely based on the practical experience and knowledge of the author, which had a positive impact on its contents. Without any doubt, it is a reliably and skillfully written book that should serve all “horsey people” well.

    Prof. Zbigniew Jaworski
    Head of the Department of Horse Breeding and Equestrian Studies, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland

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    The book will be available in an English version soon.

    EQUINE MASSAGE
    SZKOŁA REHABILITACJI TERMOGRAFIA KONI
    Horse Massage-Equine Thermography - Saddle fit
    SERVICE

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    EQUINE MASSAGE - EQUINE REHABILITATION AND THERMOGRAPHY SCHOOL

    Horse Massage

    Usługi_masaż
    Horse massage treatment, for which the main function is to release fascial tissue to allow the horse’s body to work at its highest potential, with prolonged muscle relaxation freeing them from unnecessary tension and soreness.

    Equine Thermography

    Usługi_termografia
    Thermography is as a non – invasive diagnostic imaging method detecting body surface temperature distribution. Thermography has found a broad range of applications in equine sport, veterinary and rehabilitation medicine.

    SADDLE FIT

    Uslugi siodla
    Veterinary medicine often fails to identify saddle fit as a problem, instead focusing on addressing the pain and lesions secondary to an ill – fitting saddle. Muscular back pain is frequently a secondary problem to an ill – fitting saddle.

    READ MORE ABOUT HORSE MASSAGE

    Our company offers two types of treatment:
    Equine Myofascial Release (MFR) – treatment in which the main function is to release fascial tissue to allow the horse’s body to work at its highest potential, with prolonged muscle relaxation freeing them from unnecessary tension and soreness.
    Myofascial release applies sustained pressure to the fascial system and has effects on the elastin and collagen. Treatment can also help improve circulation and reduce inflammation in joints and muscles. It can help your horse be more relaxed by relieving tension and reducing the risk of overusing other muscles that compensate for any discomfort.
    The treatment incudes manual assessment of the horse body to provide specific indicators to soft tissue injuries and also to detect saddle fit problems, training overloads etc.
    Treatment gives you noticeable results after the first treatment.

    Sports massage therapy – increases the ability of the horse in training and improves the function of the body. This massage regenerates muscles, increases flexibility of joints and ligaments, and accelerates metabolism. It also reduces stiffness and can help to speed up the natural repair of damaged tissue resulting from physical exercise.

    Important benefits of a regular massage treatment:

    • Improves circulation and, as a result, promotes more rapid healing.
    • Pain, stress and muscle tension relief.
    • Stimulates circulation in the lymphatic system and hastens the elimination of waste products.
    • Gives more efficient movement.
    • Enhances muscle tone.
    • Increases flexibility and range of motion.
    • Prevents injury.
    • Maintains the entire body in better physical condition.
    • Extends and improves the quality of the animal’s athletic career.

    When does your horse need massage therapy?

    • If your horse has any of the following symptoms:
    • Dislikes being groomed;
    • Cold backed when tacked up;
    • Head tossing;
    • High headed;
    • Head tilting;
    • Lack of poll flexion and bend;
    • Lack of forward impulsion;
    • Difficulty with lateral movements;
    • Refusal to pick-up correct lead;
    • Has an uneven stride length;
    • Unexplained lameness;
    • Prefers one rein;
    • Bucking;
    • Holding the tail to one side;
    • Excessive rolling.

    All of these could be signs of pain or discomfort and should be investigated.

    If you are interested in massage treatment for your horse please contact me, I will be happy to help.
    Dr Maria Soroko
    Mail: kontakt@eqma.pl
    0048 507595109

    READ MORE ABOUT EQUINE THERMOGRAPHY

    Thermography is as a non – invasive diagnostic imaging method detecting body surface temperature distribution. Thermography has found a broad range of applications in equine sport and veterinary medicine for :

    • enhancing clinical assessment of the horse;
    • identification of pathological conditions associated mainly with inflammation processes of the distal parts of the limbs and back;
    • detection of subclinical signs of inflammation before the onset of clinical signs of pathology, providing great value in veterinary medicine;
    • following-up to detect improvement and progression of healing processes;
    • assessing musculoskeletal stress caused by training;
    • monitoring changes of horse surface temperature during training (dynamic thermography);
    • determining welfare compliance in sport horses;
    • checking the saddle fit.

    Procedures of preparation of the horse for thermographic examination:
    Both internal and external factors have a significant effect on body surface temperature. Therefore thermographic measurement should be performed in a controlled environment and with a prepared horse.

    • The thermographic examination should be performed indoors, in areas sheltered from the sunlight, in the absence of air drafts (Palmer 1981; Turner 2001).
    • The temperature of the examination area should be cooler than body surface temperature, with the recommended ambient temperature maintained between 21°C to 26°C.
    • The recommended acclimatisation time for the horse prior to imaging is 20 minutes (Purohit 2009). However a longer period of equilibration will be required if a horse is transported from an extreme cold or hot environment.
    • High humidity should be avoided.
    • The horse must have a clean, dry hair coat and skin and should be groomed at least one hour before the examination. Dry dirt can be brushed away approximately 10 minutes before scanning.
    • The feet should be clean, picked out and brushed to remove external contamination.
    • Hair coat should be short, of uniform length, and lay flat against the skin to permit thermal conduction (Turner et al. 1983).
    • Blankets should be removed at least 30 minutes before thermographic examination, and any bandages should be removed at least two hours before imaging (Palmer 1981).
    • Imaging should be performed prior to exercise.
    • The horse should not receive any physical therapy within 24 hours prior to the thermographic examination, and should not have acupuncture in the region of the examination during the previous week.
    • Any systemic or topical medications should not be applied prior to imaging, and any residues should be washed off the previous day (Turner 1991).
    • Anti – inflammatory medications, vasoactive drugs, regional and local blocks, sedation and tranquilisation should be avoided because of their effect on superficial perfusion (Purohit 2009).

    Artifacts can be produced by any material on the body surface such as dirt, thick coat, scars and bands (Stromberg 1974; Palmer 1981).

    We offer

    • Full body imaging for general assessment of the horse, veterinary diagnosis, pre-purchase examination with written report identifying ‘areas of interest’. Images will include:
    • Lateral aspect of the whole body from both sides;
    • All four distal parts of limbs from dorsal, palmar/plantar, lateral and medial aspects;
    • Feet;
    • The lateral upper part of the thoracic and pelvic areas, and also the lateral aspect of the neck, head and trunk from both sides;
    • Back (thoracic and lumbar vertebrae) from dorsal aspect;
    • Pelvis area (sacral vertebrae) from dorsal aspect.
      The same examination can be repeated after work.
    • Checking the saddle fit.
      Images taken will include pre and post views of the back and an image of the saddle pommels post work with written report
    • ‘Area of Interest’
      Images taken will include parts of the body, for example to assess injury healing or rehabilitation effects.
    READ MORE ABOUT SADDLE FIT

    A proper saddle fit is essential for the comfort of your horse.
    Improper saddle-fit is a significant cause of physical and behavioral equine performance problems associated with:

    • Swelling, heat and pain in the muscles under the saddle;
    • Atrophy of the muscles on either side of the withers;
    • Scar tissue around the shoulder blades;
    • White hairs under the saddle;
    • Acute and chronic muscular tension in the neck and back ;
    • Joint problems in the hocks and stifles;
    • Hindlimb lameness;
    • Concussive problems in the front feet;
    • Forelimbs lameness — tripping and stumbling.

    Traditional veterinary medicine often fails to identify saddle fit a problem, instead focusing on addressing the pain and specific anatomic lesions secondary to an ill – fitting saddle. Muscular back pain and over – riding spinous processes, hock or stifle arthritis, and tendon and ligament desmitis or tears are frequent secondary problems to ill – fitting saddles due to direct trauma of the back.
    Improper saddle fit can be associated with

    • Individual body build of the horse;
    • Change of the back line shape (muscle development, muscle loss);
    • Asymmetric body build of the horse (especially of the shoulder or back area) which can be associated with past injuries of the horse;
    • Uneven work of the hindlimbs;
    • Uneven rider’s sit .

    Our company offers:
    Consultations in saddle fit with additional thermographic examination of saddle fit.
    For more information contact: Dr Maria Soroko, Mail: kontakt@eqma.pl, 0048 507495109

     

    EQUINE THERMOGRAPHY EXAMINATION

    EQUINE THERMOGRAPHY IN SADDLE FIT

    COURSES

    COURSES

    Equine Massage Course – level 1

    The aim of the course
    The course covers the manual and visual assessment of the horse body including conformation and introduces a sports massage session.
    The main objective of the course is to gain knowledge and skills in the context of equine sports massage. The program includes theoretical and practical training on: horse biomechanics in the context of the work of muscles and manual / visual assessment of the horse. Course is introduced with a lot of practical sessions. The course has been designed to make it accessible for learning the practical skills necessary for regular work with horses every day.
    This course is designed for horse owners to learn skills in monitoring the health of their horses and students wishing to start their future career in the field of equine bodywork. The course is also attend by veterinarians, human massage therapists, equine massage therapists from other courses, trainers and yard managers who would like to enhance their skills or continue their education within their profession.

    After completing the two day course the student will have learnt:
    •    Manual and visual assessment of the horse.
    •    Massage techniques applied for quick assessment of the horse and for the release of tension before and after exercises.
    •    Basic sports massage session.
    The course covers 15 hours (7 h of theory and 8 h of practice). After completing the course the participant obtains a certificate.

    Course program

    First day (Saturday)
    Morning program (8.30 – 12.30)
    •    Horse anatomy – introduction to the skeletal and muscular system.
    •    Basic location of bones and muscles.
    •    Demonstrating the key assessment areas of the horse body.
    Afternoon program (13.30 – 16.30)

    •    Bony landmarks identification.
    •    Visual and manual assessment of the horse before massage – presentation.
    •    Group assessment of the demo horses (set up in groups).

    Second day (Sunday)
    Morning program (8.30 – 11.00)
    •    Benefits of sports massage.
    •    Key areas of assessment in five sections of the body.
    •    Basic techniques in the massage – rocking the spine technique.
    •    Massage session – neck and shoulder area.

    Afternoon program (13.30 – 15.30)
    •    Massage session – trunk and croup area.
    •    Summary of practical sessions.
    •     Questions.

    Classes are conducted in a group of 10 participants.

    The course is presented by:

    Dr. Maria Soroko – owner and director of the company “Equine Massage – Maria Soroko”, which offers equine rehabilitation and thermography services. Maria gained her PhD in Agricultural Science with a specialisation in Animal Husbandry from the University of Environmental and Life Sciences of Wroclaw, Department of Horse Breeding and Equestrian Studies. Her Masters degree in Equine Science was completed in 2010 at the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales, United Kingdom. Maria has many years of experience in equine physiotherapy, achieving qualifications as an Equine Body Worker in sport massage and remedial therapy. Maria is also a riding instructor at the British Horse Society. Her skills and experience were achieved both in Europe and Australia. Since 2008 she has practiced thermography extensively in equine physiotherapy and in veterinary medicine, cooperating with veterinarians, horse breeders and trainers. Maria is also Founder and chairperson of the Association of Animal Thermography, Wroclaw.

    Equine Massage course – level 2

    Purpose of the course
    The program includes theoretical and practical lectures on: equine biomechanics, in the context of muscle physiology, updated manual assessment techniques, saddle fit issues. The course includes an extended equine sport massage session. Classes are conducted in a group of 10 participants.

    The course is for students who attended the equine massage level 1 course.

    Number of hours
    The course covers 15 hours (7 h of theory and 8 h of practice). After completing the course the participant obtains a certificate.

    Program of the course

    First day (Saturday)
    Morning program (8.30 – 12.30)
    •    Demonstration of new assessment techniques of the horse.
    •    Evaluation of posture in response to performance issues.
    •    Practical session of horse assessment  – new assessment techniques.
    Afternoon program (13.30 – 16.30)
    •    Temporomandibular disorders.
    •    Sport massage session – new techniques.

    Second day (Sunday)
    Morning program (8.30 – 12.30)
    •    Introduction to saddle fitting issues.
    •    Saddle fit – practice.
    •    Sports massage session – new techniques.
    Afternoon program (13.30 – 16.00)
    •    Temporomandibular disorders.
    •    Summary of practical sessions.
    •    Questions.

    The course is presented by:
    Dr. Maria Soroko – owner and director of the company “Equine Massage – Maria Soroko”, which offers equine rehabilitation and thermography services. Maria gained her PhD in Agricultural Science with a specialisation in Animal Husbandry from the University of Environmental and Life Sciences of Wroclaw, Department of Horse Breeding and Equestrian Studies. Her Masters degree in Equine Science was completed in 2010 at the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales, United Kingdom. Maria has many years of experience in equine physiotherapy, achieving qualifications as an Equine Body Worker in sport massage and remedial therapy. Maria is also a riding instructor at the British Horse Society. Her skills and experience were achieved both in Europe and Australia. Since 2008 she  has practiced thermography extensively in equine physiotherapy and in veterinary medicine, cooperating with veterinarians, horse breeders and trainers. Maria is also Founder and chairperson of the Association of Animal Thermography, Wroclaw.

    Equine thermography course

    This two-day course introduces the practical application of thermography in veterinary medicine, rehabilitation, in sport performance, and in saddle fit.
    The program includes the physical basis of thermography, equine anatomy and physiology necessary for thermographic image interpretation, preparation of horse and environment for thermographic examination and proper horse positioning. The course also focuses on how to choose and operate an appropriate infrared camera.

    Program of the course

    First day (lectures from 9.00 till 16.00)
    Morning session (9.00– 13.00):
    •    Introduction to equine thermal imaging.
    •    The physical basis of thermography.
    •    Thermoregulation of the horse.
    •    Exchange of heat between horse body and the external environment.
    •    The basis of body physiology.
    •    Body surface temperature patterns of the healthy horse.
    •    Thermal patterns of distal parts of the limbs.
    •    Thermal patterns of head, neck, chest, croup and back.
    •    The influence of external environment on body surface temperature distribution.
    •    The influence of training on body surface temperature distribution.
    Break (13.00 – 14.00)
    Afternoon session (14.00 -16.00):
    •    Application of thermography in equine veterinary medicine.
    •    Application of thermography in rehabilitation.
    •    Camera introduction – practical session.
    •     Preparation of the horse for thermographic examination.
    •    Preparation of the environment for thermographic examination.
    Day II– (classes from 9.00 till 16.00)
    Morning program (9.00 – 12.00):
    •    Proper horse positioning.
    •    Taking the right thermographic images.
    •    Interpretation of thermographic images.
    Break (12.00 – 13.00)
    Afternoon session (13.00 -15.00):
    •    Thermographic reports.
    •    Saddle fit – thermographic examination.
    •    Advantages and disadvantages of thermography.
    •    Thermography as a complementary diagnostic tool to ultrasonography and radiography techniques.
    •    Questions.

     

    Training Equine Massage

    CALENDAR

    CALENDAR

    EQUINE MASSAGE COURSES DATES, STABLE VISITS DATES,SEMINARS DATES

    KURS ZAWODOWY MASAŻU KONI
    KURS ZAWODOWY MASAŻU KONI
    14-15.02; 28-01.03;7-8.03.2015

    KURS MASAŻU KONI
    6 dniowy kurs zorganizowany w 3 zjazdach weekendowych,
    w Wielkiej Lipie koło Wrocławia
    Zapisy i szczegółowe informacje: Studium Fizjoterapii Zwierząt

    MASAŻE - STRZEGOM I OKOLICE
    MASAŻE – STRZEGOM I OKOLICE
    03.02.2015

    Masaże w Strzegomiu, Szymanów
    Zapisy: Maria Soroko
    e-mail: kontakt@eqma.pl
    tel. 507-495-109

    Warsztaty masażu koni I stopień
    Warsztaty masażu koni I stopień
    07-08.02.2015

    Warsztaty Masaż Sportowy Koni I stopień
    Stajnia Equi Verso, Jastrzębie Zdrój www.equi-verso.pl
    Zapisy: Anna Gotowiecka
    e-mail: equiverso@o2.pl
    tel.:602 784 804
    www.equi-verso.pl/aktualnosci/warsztaty-masazu-sportowego-koni-i-stopien-3/

    MASAŻE - KATOWICE, BYTOM, KRAKÓW, ZAKOPANE
    MASAŻE – KATOWICE, BYTOM, KRAKÓW, ZAKOPANE
    31-02.02.15

    Masaże Katowicach, Bytomiu, Krakowie, Zakopanym
    Zapisy: Maria Soroko
    e-mail: kontakt@eqma.pl
    tel. 507-495-109

    SEMINARIUM PT.: Termografia kolorowa diagnostyka w fizjoterapii koni
    SEMINARIUM PT.: Termografia kolorowa diagnostyka w fizjoterapii koni
    06.02.2015

    Informacje: www.facebook.com/EqmaSzkolaRehabilitacji
    Miejsce: Stajnia EquiVerso, Jastrzębie Zdrój
    www.equi-verso.pl
    Zapisy: Maria Soroko, kontakt@eqma.pl
    tel.:507-495-109

    MASAŻE - WARSZAWA
    MASAŻE – WARSZAWA
    luty 2015

    Masaże w Warszawie
    Zapisy: Maria Soroko
    e-mail: kontakt@eqma.pl
    tel. 507-495-109

    Warsztaty masażu koni II stopień w Olsztynie
    Warsztaty masażu koni II stopień w Olsztynie
    11-12.04.2015



    Warsztaty Masaż Sportowy Koni II stopień
    Ośrodek Jeździecki Kortowo, Olsztyn
    Zapisy: Maria Soroko
    e-mail: kontakt@eqma.pl
    tel.:507-495-109

    WKRÓTCE
    WKRÓTCE

     

    Publications

    Publications

    RESEARCH TEAM PUBLICATIONS

    JOURNAL: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 2014, 34(9), 1076–1083
    TITLE: Thermographic evaluation of racehorse performance
    AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Krzysztof Dudek, Kevin Howell, Ewa Jodkowska, Radomir Henklewski

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Aim: The present study was aimed at identifying the key thermographic diagnostic areas essential for monitoring the effect of training on racehorses.
    Method: The study involved monitoring 15 racehorses in 13 imaging sessions over a period of 10 months. Temperature measurements were made at a total of 46 regions of interest (ROIs) at the distal parts of the limbs and the back. In order to account for the influence of ambient temperature on each ROI measurement, values were adjusted to a constant ambient temperature of 12C, estimated using regression analysis. The horses in the study were divided into two groups based on the value of success rate in racing competition.
    Results: During the research period none of the horses were identified as injured by routine veterinary investigation. Successful horses had significantly warmer adjusted ROI temperatures than their less successful counterparts at both carpal joints, the 3rd metacarpal bones, the left fetlock joint, the left front short pastern bone, the left tarsus joint, and the caudal part of the thoracic vertebrae.
    Conclusion: The study tested a protocol for recording body surface temperature in racehorses which was shown to increase reliability by adjusting for variations in ambient temperature. When analyzed on the basis of sporting performance, the protocol identified 14 ROIs that were associated with superior performance, the majority of which were at the limbs on the left side.

    Keywords: thermography; racehorses; sport performance; training

    Fig. 1. Thermogram of dorsal aspect of distal part of forelimbs. Measured ROIs: DF1 – right carpal joint, dorsal aspect; DF2 – left carpal joint, dorsal aspect; DF3 – right 3rd metacarpal bone, dorsal aspect; DF4 – left 3rd metacarpal bone, dorsal aspect; DF5 – right fetlock joint, dorsal aspect; DF6 – left fetlock joint, dorsal aspect; DF7 – right short pastern bone, dorsal aspect; DF8 – left short pastern bone, dorsal aspect; DF9 – right hoof, dorsal aspect; DF10 – left hoof, dorsal aspect.

     

    JOURNAL: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 2013, 33, 760-762
    TITLE: The effectiveness of thermographic analysis in equine orthopedics
    AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Radomir Henklewski, Henryk Filipowski, Ewa Jodkowska

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    One of the main advantages of equine thermography is the detection of subclinical inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine a specific threshold value of temperature change indicative of subclinical inflammation of the lower parts of the horse’s limb. The study involved monitoring 20 racehorses over a period of 10 months. Temperatures of the third metacarpal region were measured every 3 weeks, allowing the average temperature differences to be ascertained between the same areas of forelimbs from the dorsal and palmar aspects in each session. Additionally, ultrasonographic and radiographic standard examinations of lower part of forelimbs were conducted to diagnose any pathological conditions of lower forelimbs. To determine the threshold value of temperature difference the receiver operating characteristic curve method was used, based on thermographic examinations of the same measured area in 20 horses. The threshold value of temperature difference indicative of subclinical inflammation was found to be 1.25_C. In conclusion, thermography can be used as a quick and practical diagnostic tool of subclinical inflammation. These results provide additional support from  the continued study of the equine thermography.

    Keywords: thermography, inflammation, horses, racehorses

    Fig. 1. Thermography image of palmar aspect of lower part of forelimbs. Examined areas on symmetrical lower part of forelimbs from palmar aspect are shown. Measured lines: L1 – proximal part of IIIed metacarpal bone; L3 – middle part of IIIed metacarpal bone; L5 – distal part of IIIed metacarpal bone. The length of each vertical line is equal to vertical lines A, B, C which divide superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) into three measurement areas (A, B, C) for ultrasonographic examination.

     

    JOURNAL: Veterinary Medicine, 2015,
    TITLE: Thermography diagnosis in monitoring annual racehorses’ training cycle
    AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Ewa Jodkowska, Krzysztof Dudek

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Results of previous studies indicate the possibility of determining the impact of training on horses’ body surface temperature. The study was aimed at identifying the usefulness of thermography in monitoring annual training cycle of racehorses. The study involved 64 clinically healthy racehorses trained for flat racing in the 2011 and 2012 seasons. The study was based at measuring body surface temperature of the lower parts of forelimbs and back in 13 sessions in each season for a period of 10 months. On 3,328 thermographic images 24 regions of interest (ROI) were determined. In each ROI the average temperature was calculated (Tavg ° C). The surface temperature of the distal parts of forelimbs and the back measured at rest was increasing with each session, which was related to duration of the training cycle. The thermographic diagnosis was useful in monitoring changes of the body surface temperature in training cycle and in detecting injuries caused by training overloads.

    Keywords: horses, racing, thermography, training

    Fig. 1. Thermogram of dorsal aspect of back. Measured ROIs: B1 – cranial part of thoracic vertebrae dorsal aspect; B2 – caudal part of thoracic vertebrae dorsal aspect, dorsal aspect; BL1 – left side of thoracic vertebrae, dorsal aspect; BR1 – right side of thoracic vertebrae, dorsal aspect; B3 – lumbar vertebrae, dorsal aspect; B4 – sacroiliac joins.

     

    JOURNAL: Veterinary Medicine, 2012, 68(11):693-696
    TITLE: Compare of thermographic, radiographic and ultrasonographic results in diagnosing racehorses ortopedic disesases
    AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Radomir Henklewski, Ewa Jodkowska

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    The aim of the study was to define efficiency of thermography as a complementary diagnostic method for lower part of forelimbs diagnosing during training cycle of racehorses. The study was conducted on 20 horses on which during the period of 6 months three examinations of thermography, USG and RTG of lower part of forelimbs were taken at the same time. The average temperature differences were measured from the dorsal and palmar views of the metacarpal bone in the same areas of the right and left forelimbs. The ultrasonography of the field cross-sectional area of the superficial digital flexor tendon detected differences between the same areas of metacarpal bone in right and left forelimbs. The radiography detected differences between the metacarpal bone cortex thickness in those limbs. For comparisons of three examinations results, rang Spearmana correlation coefficient  was used. Thermography and USG examinations were correlated in diagnosis of clinical signs of inflammation and there for can be used alternately. RTG examinations correlated with themography in the final stages of the inflammatory processes.

    Keywords: thermography, ultrasonography, radiography, racehorses, orthopedic diseases

    Fig 1. Thermography image of dorsal view of lower part of forelimbs. Examined areas on symmetrical lower part of forelimbs from dorsal aspect. Measured areas: G1, G2- medianum part of metacarpal bone; G3, G6 – Lateral part of metacarpal bone; G4, G5 – medial part of metacarpal bone
    Fig 2. Radiographic image of lateral aspect of the left metacarpal bone.

     

    JOURNAL: Thermology International 2012, 22(3):152-156
    TITLE: The use of thermography to evaluate back musculoskeletal responses of young racehorses to training
    TITLE: Maria Soroko, Ewa Jodkowska, Magdalena Zabłocka

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Thermography has been used for the diagnosis of skin temperature variations caused by overloads of the musculoskeletal system. The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficiency of thermography in monitoring racehorses’ musculoskeletal system response of back overloads due to increasing intensity of training cycle.. The thermographic examinations of 20 racehorses’ back were performed at Partynice Racing Track (Poland) every 3 weeks in twelve sessions during a period of 10 months. The back was divided into 5 areas: thoracic vertebrae (T), lumbar vertebrae (L), sacroiliac join (SIJ), and symmetric sides of the thoracic vertebrae area left side (ML) right side (MR). From each area the average temperature was measured. For statistic analyses the nonparametric Kruskal – Wallis test was used. An increase in the training intensity resulted in significant decreases in average temperature differences between T and L, T and SIJ, T and ML and T and MR. Constant training overloads of the musculoskeletal system under demanding exercise resulted in increased blood circulation of a back. The analysis of the surface temperature distribution over the horse’s back will allow to develop a model of blood circulation within this area in intensive training cycle. It will help specialists, breeders and veterinarians to analyse the fundamentals in physiological response of the musculoskeletal system to intensity of training. These results provide additional support for the continued study on the equine thermography.

    Fig. 1. Thermogram of the back from dorsal aspect. Inflammation of the back muscles in the thoracic vertebrae area.
    Fig. 2. Thermogram of the back from dorsal aspect. Inflammation of the spinous processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae.

     

    JOURNAL: Biomedical Engineering, 2011, 17(2):104-109
    TITLE: Thermographic diagnosis of sport horses’ limbs
    AUTOR: Maria Soroko

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Thermography may be used as an effective tool for lameness detection in sport horses. The main advantage of thermographic diagnosis is predicting lameness before clinical signs occur.
    The main objective of the study was to assess the usefulness of thermography for trainers monitoring horse’s limbs. The study was conducted on 14 Polish Halfbred (sp) and 14 Arabian (oo)  acing horses. Thermographic images of lower part of the limbs once per week for 6 weeks, were recorded. The temperature differences between symmetric parts of limbs were compared. For the analysis a Student’s t test, was applied. It was demonstrated that in 24 horses no changes occurred, and no lameness or associated problems, were reported. One of the remaining four horses demonstrated the forelimb overload, possibly associated with past injuries. Thermography assessment may be helpful for monitoring an intensive training of horses.

    Keywords: thermography; horses; lameness, lower limb injury

    Fig 1. Horse nr 1. Forelimbs from dorsal aspect, V session. Ambient temperature: 18.8°C, humidity:71.5%.

     

    JOURNAL: Veterinary Magazine, 2013, 196 (22):879-883
    TITLE: The effectiveness of thermographic analysis in diagnosing racehorses orthopedic diseases
    AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Radomir Henklewski

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Thermography is a noninvasive diagnostic method which detects infrared radiation emitted from the body surface. Detecting of body superficial skin temperature allows thermography to monitor pathological conditions of horse’s lower part of the limbs. The main advantage of thermography is detection of pathologic conditions for sore shins and inflammation of superficial digital flexor tendon before they become evident.

    Keywords: thermography, equine, inflammation

    Fig. 1. Thermogram of the distal part of the right and left forelimbs from dorsal aspect. Clinical inflammation of the right and left 3rd metacarpal bone.

     

    JOURNAL: Veterinary Medicine,2011, 67:397 – 401
    TITLE: Usefulness of thermography apply in horse’s diagnosis and in equine sports industry
AUTORS: Maria Soroko, Ewa Jodkowska

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Thermography has  fund a broad  range of application as it is able to measure surface temperature. It has been seen studied as a useful diagnostic tool in veterinary medicine. Detecting of superficial skin temperature allows it to monitor pathological conditions  of horse’s  limbs and spine. The main advantage of thermography is detection of pathologic conditions before they become evident, providing extreme value in veterinary medicine diagnosis. Thermography is used in monitoring influence of  different medicines on superficial skin temperature distribution. It has also found application in horse breeding and in equine sports industry.

    Keywords: thermography, horses, temperature , lameness

    Fig 1. Thermogram of the distal part of the left and right forelimbs from palmar aspect. Inflammation of the superficial digital flexor tendon of the left forelimb.

     

    JOURNAL: Życie Weterynaryjne, 2012, 87(2):749-752.
    TITLE: The effectiveness of thermograpy in equine veterinary medicine
    AUTORS: Ewa Jodkowska,. Maria Soroko

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    The interests of equine body superficial temperature distribution, is useful in understanding the fundamental physiological changes in response to external environment, training overloads and pathological conditions. Usefulness of equine thermography has been proved in the aspect of training, management and veterinary diagnosis, including  pathological conditions associated mainly with inflammation processes. Thermographic images distribute the map of body superficial temperature determining the warmest and the coldest area on the horse’s body. The body superficial temperature is changing in response to external environmental conditions and physiological effort.   The left to right body symmetry  of the superficial temperature distribution were indicated. That allowed to diagnose unilateral pathological conditions mainly associated with orthopedic and spine diseases. It was found that the main advantage of equine thermography is the detection of subclinical inflammation.

    Keywords: thermography, horses, superficial body temperature

    Fot. 1. Thermogram of the ledt lateral aspect of the horse. The warmest areas of the body are presented in white and red colors, yellow and green colors present cooler areas, blue and navy colors represent the coldest areas of the body.

     

    JOURNAL: Pomiar, Automatyka, Kontrola, 2011, 57(10):1157-1160
    TITLE: Analyses of superficial temperature distribution of lower part of the limbs in young racing horses
    AUTOR: Maria Soroko

    READ ABSTRACT

    ABSTRACT:

    Introduction: Thermography is non-invasive and non-contact diagnostic tool, which detects infra-red radiation emitted from body surface, mapping superficial skin surface temperature. It has been studied that the main advantage of thermography is detection of early subclinical signs of inflammation. In many studies thermography was used for lameness diagnosis of  young racing horses, which are put under extreme physical demands causing many injuries especially of lower part of the front limbs. It is associated with overloading of musculoskeletal system resulting in lameness and performance loss. Thermography has been found as a useful equine diagnostic tool in recognizing of unilateral abnormalities such as: navicular syndrome, laminitis, inflammation of tendons, carpus and tarsus joints. It has been study that thermography can indicate subclinical signs of inflammation before clinical signs become evident, playing an essential role in preventing lameness in racing horses.
    Objective: The objective of the study was to predict subclinical signs of pathology inflammation associated with intensive training of young Polish Halfbred (sp) and Arabian (oo) race horses during training cycle applying temperature analysis of lower part of front limbs for bilateral pathology.
    Materials and Methods: The study was based on 20 flat racing horses (12 sp and 8 oo) in age of 3 years, kept in Training Centre. Thermographic images of lower part of front limbs  from cranial view were taken every third week for 6 months (for 12 sp) and for 4 months (for 8 oo). Environmental conditions were recorded during each session and included the ambient air temperature and humidity inside the yard. During the measurement period the thermal images were regularly discussed and compared with trainer’s concerns and observations. Thermography camera VarioCAM equipped with an uncooled microbolometer focal plane arrays (FPA) detector, with geometrical resolution of 640 x 480 pixels made by InfraTec was used for comparing average temperatures of symmetrical areas of lower part of the limb. The 32 bit software suite IRBIS 3 Professional program, InfraTec company was used for the analysis of thermographic images. Environmental temperature and humidity was measured by a digital psychrometer model C200, produced by Lufft Company. The symmetrical areas of the lower part of the limb : carpus joint (X1- right, X2- left) metacarpal bone (X3- right, X4 – left): long pastern, short pastern bone ( X5- right, X6-left) hoof (X6- right,X7-left) from cranial view were identified and analyzed for average temperature differences for each horse during research cycle. The results were analyzed using a Student’s t-test to compare average temperature differences of each area between symmetrical right and left measured area of each horse. The level of significance was determined as (0,05), great significant (0,01), most significant (0,001).
    Results: From the total 20 horses : 16 showed no changes in their soundness, and no lameness or other associated problems were reported for these horses over the period of investigation. Remaining 4 horses demonstrated subclinical signs of inflammation caused by sore shire in the area of the metacarpal bone. During the cycle research Horses A,B,C and D in the sessions: III -VI indicated constant increased temperature of the right and left metacarpal bone indicating early stages of inflammation process. Inflammation of bilateral metacarpal bones was confirmed by veterinary between IV and V session. In case of Horse D in session IV area of the right metacarpal bone had statistically increased temperature, indicating subclinical stages of inflammation. Inflammation process in the area of the right metacarpal bone were confirmed by veterinary between V and VI session. In VII session area of injured metacarpal bone of A,B,C,D Horses demonstrated decreased of the temperature, indicating healing process what was confirmed by veterinary.
    Summary: Applied method of comparing average temperatures value of symmetrical areas , monitored during the research cycle allowed detection abnormalities also in case of their bilateral accrue of symmetrical areas. Thermography assessment accelerated identification of subclinical signs of inflammation, about 4 weeks before clinical signs has occurred. Current study proofed that infra-red diagnosis is useful in detection of pathology when images are taken regularly, within a specified period of time and they are properly interpreted. It will help in  protection and identification of lower limb pathology.

    Keywords: thermography, temperature analyzes, inflammation, horses

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